Spring in Tatton Park, Cheshire, England – May 2013

Spring in Tatton Park, Cheshire, England - May 2013

www.tattonpark.org.uk/

Welcome to Tatton Park

Tatton Park is one of the UK’s most complete historic estates. It is home to a Tudor Old Hall, Neo-Classical Mansion, 50 acres of landscaped gardens, a rare-breed farm and 1,000 acres of deer park. Our speciality shops, restaurant, adventure playground, events and educational programmes combine to make Tatton one of the most popular family days out in the North West.
The Old Hall was the estate manor house until the late 17th century, when work commenced on a new house. The Neo Classical Mansion, is celebrated for its Gillows furniture and collection of ceramics, paintings and books. The library collection is considered one of the finest in the National Trust.
50 acres of beautiful gardens reflect over 250 years of garden design.The gardens are renowned for their remarkable glasshouses, the Japanese Garden, considered the finest in Europe and the extensive Kitchen Gardens.
The working rare-breed farm is a must-see for our family visitors. Meet our rare breed cattle, horses, sheep, pigs, goats, poultry and donkeys and take part in themed events throughout the year.
Herds of Red and Fallow deer roam freely in 1,000 acres of parkland. The meres, woodlands and rough grassland provide a perfect habitat for wildlife. The parkland is a stunning setting for a leisurely stroll or high-octane cycle. Children adore the adventure playground.
Tatton hosts over 100 events a year including the RHS Flower Show, Summer Picnic Concerts with the Hallé Orchestra, car shows, antiques fairs and much more.
For nearly 400 years the estate was the property of the Egerton family until it was bequeathed to the National Trust in 1958. It is financed and maintained by Cheshire East Council.
Tatton Park was the winner of Cheshire’s Large Visitor Attraction of the Year 2009 and 2010.
Learn about our day-to-day life at Tatton in the Tatton Park Blog.

Your Visit to Tatton Park

We look forward to welcoming you to Tatton Park.
Planning your visit to Tatton Park
For information about opening times and prices, access, getting to Tatton Park and other useful tips for planning your visit to Tatton Park, please click on the tabs to the left or above.
What to do at Tatton Park
Information about our individual attractions (Mansion, Gardens, Farm, Old Hall, Parkland, Shopping and Eating and Drinking) and our events programme can be found under ‘What to See and Do’ at Tatton Park

Events at Tatton Park
For details of Tatton Park’s annual event’s programme take a look at What’s On. at Tatton.
You can view or download a map of Tatton Park (PDF, 1.33MB) and a plan of the Tatton Park Stableyard area (PDF, 987KB) before your visit.
If you cannot find the information you require here, please contact our office on 01625 374400 (office hours only).
We welcome your feedback! Please let us know what you think of the Tatton Park site
Some of the first people you will meet at Tatton are our Visitor Assistants! You can ‘meet the team’ here.

Tatton Park Opening Times and Entrance Prices
Attraction and Park Entry Prices
March 26 2011 to March 23 2012
Tatton Park Vehicle Entry Charge £5.00
Blue Badge Holder £2.50

• Tatton Park Car entry fee applies to all visitors including National Trust members.
• Tatton Park Car entry passes are available to purchase: Call 01624 374400 for details or download a Tatton Park car entry pass application form (PDF, 80KB).

Prices per Single Attraction (Tatton Park’s Farm, Mansion, Old Hall and Gardens)
Adult £5
Child (5 – 15 years) £3
Family (2 adults and up to 3 children) £13
For Discounted Entry to all of Tatton Park’s 3 attractions Buy a Totally Tatton Ticket!
Totally Tatton Ticket (Entry to Mansion, Gardens and Farm)
Adult £8
Child (5 – 15 years) £4
Family (2 adults and up to 3 children) £20
• Ticket can be used on another day if one or more of Tatton Park’s attractions are not visited – Park entry charge would apply
• Tickets are available at each attraction
• Tickets may not be used for certain special events
National Trust Members
Free entry to the Mansion and Gardens (except Christmas events in the Mansion)
50{96604b6ca0a8b686e79bea63c6d51439e60536dda59c7644d866e62bc465ba44} discount to the Farm
Supplementary charges apply for special events and tours at Tatton Park
RHS Members
Free entry to the Gardens.
Groups – see Tatton Park’s group visit for information
Tatton Park, all attractions and shops are open on Bank Holidays except Christmas Day. Prices and opening times may be altered without notice for special events, weekend opening and other similar occasions.

Opening Dates and Times

Low Season
Monday 31 October 2011 to Friday 23 March 2012High Season
Saturday 24 March 2012 to Sunday 28 October 2012
Please note the Mansion and Farm are closed on Monday except Bank Holidays during High Season.
Park: Open Tuesday to Sunday and Bank Holiday Mondays 11am to 5pm (last entry 4pm).Park: Open daily 10am to 7pm (last entry 6pm).
Farm: Open Saturday and Sunday 11am to 4pm (last entry 3pm)
Please note the Farm is open December 24 to January 2, closed Christmas Day. The Farm is also open Tuesday 14 to Fri 17 February 2012.Farm: Open Tuesday to Sunday 12pm to 5pm (last entry 4pm). Closed during the RHS Jul 18 – 22.
Gardens: Open Tuesday to Sunday and bank holiday Mondays, 11am to 4pm (last entry 3pm).Gardens: Open daily 10am to 6pm (last entry 5pm).
Mansion: Closed except for Christmas events.
Mansion: Open Tuesday to Sunday, 1pm-5pm (last entry 4pm). Guided tours 12pm, small extra charge (applies to NT members also).
Old Hall: Closed.Old Hall: Open for special events and groups as part of a pre-booked tour. Also open for special open days in 2012 April 5th,6th,12th & 13th. June 7th & 8th. July 26th & 27th. August 2nd,3rd,9th,10th,16th,17th,23rd,24th, 30th and 31st
Restaurant: Open Tuesday to Sunday and Bank Holiday Mondays, 11am to 4pm.Restaurant: Open daily 10am-6pm.
Tatton Shops: Open Tuesday to Sunday and Bank Holiday Mondays December 26 and January 2, 12pm to 4pm. Tatton Shops: Open daily 11am-5pm (Tuck Shop details below).
Tuck Shop: ClosedTuck Shop: Open Tuesday to Sunday 12pm to 5pm

How to Get to Tatton Park

Where is Tatton Park?
Tatton Park is situated in the town of Knutsford, Cheshire in the North West of England and is easily accessible from major roads and railways with good public transport links to Knutsford. It is just 20 miles from Manchester and 30 miles from Chester.
Parking is available inside the Knutsford Entrance of Tatton Park and at the Old Hall with the main parking area near Tatton Park’s Mansion and Stableyard area. The map of Tatton Park details the car parks. Coaches can enter Tatton Park for free and visitors with disabilities who show a blue badge can enter for half price. Other Tatton Park entry prices can be found under Admission Prices and Opening Times.

Tatton Park Address

Tatton Park
Knutsford
Cheshire
WA16 6QN

Tatton Park is signposted from Junction 7 of the M56 and Junction 19 of the M6. The entrance to the park is approximately half a mile from Knutsford Railway Station. It is recommended that post code WA16 6SG is used for Sat Nav systems
• Birmingham 70 mins
• Chester 35 mins
• Leeds 75 mins
• Liverpool 40 mins
• Macclesfield 20 mins
• Manchester 30 mins
• Nottingham 90 mins
• Stafford 45 mins
• Sheffield 75 mins
• Stockport 25 mins
• Wrexham 45 mins

Public Transport to Tatton Park
Knutsford Railway Station is situated half a mile from the Knutsford Entrance to Tatton Park. It is a further two mile walk down the estate drive to the Mansion and Stableyard area where the Garden entrance is located along with Tatton’s speciality shops and Stables Restaurant.
Local bus services are available to Knutsford including the number 27 from Macclesfield, 288 from Altrincham via Wilmslow and 289 from Northwich to Altrincham.

Visit Tatton Park on a Rainy Day
Tatton’s variety of attractions, shops and restaurants make it the perfect choice for a`trip out’ regardless of the weather. You can safely make arrangements to visit knowing that there will be plenty to enjoy, no matter how the weather turns out!
Tatton’s parkland and adventure playground is accessible every day in high season (beginning of April to end of October) and every day except Mondays during low season.
Entrance to the Garden and four of Tatton’s shops – Housekeeper’s Store, Garden, Gift and Tuck Shops (Tuck Shop closed low season) – are located in the Stableyard. The shops, gardens and restaurant are open every day except Monday in low season.
A vist to Tatton Park’s Mansion visit is ideal on a wetter day and most of Tatton’s Farm’s attractions can be enjoyed under cover. Both are open every day except Monday in high season and the Farm is open every weekend during low season and February school holidays. The Mansion and Farm also open for Christmas activities.
Tatton Park’s events programme includes over 100 events, many indoors and not weather dependant.

What to see and do at Tatton Park
From walks to wedding shows, car shows to Canalettos, there is something to suit every passion at Tatton Park.
It is one of the UK’s most complete historic estates offering plenty of things to do with family, kids and friends.

Amongst its many attractions are:
• Tatton Park’s neo classical mansion. A magnificent Cheshire stately home

• Tatton Park’s award-winning gardens. One of the region’s favourite gardens to visit

• Tatton Park’s working farm. A great day out for the family

• Tatton Park’s Tudor Old Hall. The estate’s oldest and most haunted building
• Tatton Park’s 1,000 acre deer park. A beautiful place to go for a day out doors
• The Stables Restaurant. A great place to eat in the Stableyard
• Speciality Shops offering the best in local and Cheshire product and gifts.

• Over 100 events offering one the best annual events programmes in the Cheshire and Manchester region
These are just some of the many reasons why our visitors return again and again to enjoy this special place.

Tatton Park’s Mansion
Set amidst more than 50 acres of Tatton Park gardens, at the heart of 1,000 acres of landscaped parkland, the elegant Mansion house at Tatton Park sits in an elevated position. The impressive portico of the South Front dominates the view of the house from the parkland.
From the turn of the 18th century the Egerton family made a home on this site. An earlier house was extensively re-modelled in the Neo-Classical style, between 1780 and 1813 by the architects Samuel Wyatt (1737-1807) and Lewis William Wyatt (1777–1853). The rich furnishings of the Tatton Park mansion and its important collection of paintings and books reflect the growing wealth and status of the Egerton family at the end of the 18th and during the 19th centuries. The mansion houses one of the National Trust’s finest libraries and an outstanding collection of Gillow’s of Lancaster furniture. Add to this the extensive array of domestic offices and servants’ quarters and the Mansion offers a complete view of life in days gone by.
Tatton Park has recently embarked on a project with the Family History Society of Cheshire to document historical information about the hundreds of people who worked and lived at Tatton Park throughout the Egerton family’s ownership. You can learn more about the Family History Society of Cheshire Project here .

Tatton Park Mansion Exhibitions
Throughout the year Tatton Park hosts a number of exhibitions in the Mansion reflecting a particular aspect of the Park and its rich history. The permanent Maurice Egerton exhibition details fascinating facts about the life and interests of Maurice Egerton, the last Baron Egerton of Tatton Park.

Tatton Park New Library Re-Display
Visitors to the mansion can now experience reading and relaxing in the Egerton family library. A large area of the Library has been re-displayed with sofas and furniture from the collection

Autumn at Grasmere, in the Lake District National Park in Cumbria, England – November 2013

Autumn  at Grasmere, in the Lake District National Park in Cumbria, England - November 2013

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Autumn

Autumn regarded as tumble in the US and Canada,[1] is a single of the four temperate seasons. Autumn marks the changeover from summer time into winter season, in September (Northern Hemisphere) or March (Southern Hemisphere) when the arrival of night time becomes significantly previously. One of its major functions is the shedding of leaves from some trees as they pave way for even more advancement.

The equinoxes may possibly be anticipated to be in the middle of their respective seasons, but temperature lag (prompted by the thermal latency of the floor and sea) signifies that seasons surface later on than dates calculated from a purely astronomical viewpoint. The true lag differs with location. Some cultures regard the autumnal equinox as “mid-autumn”, other folks with a more time lag address it as the get started of autumn.[2] Meteorologists (and most of the temperate international locations in the southern hemisphere)[three] use a definition primarily based on months, with autumn becoming September, Oct and November in the northern hemisphere,[4] and March, April and Could in the southern hemisphere.

In North The united states, autumn is generally regarded as to get started with the September equinox.[five] In standard East Asian photo voltaic expression, autumn starts on or all-around eight August and ends on about seven November. In Ireland, the autumn months according to the countrywide meteorological support, Fulfilled Éireann, are September, Oct and November.[6] On the other hand, according to the Irish Calendar, which is primarily based on historical Gaelic traditions, autumn lasts all over the months of August, September, and Oct, or probably a several times later on, based on custom. In Australia, autumn formally begins on 1 March and ends 31 Could.[seven]

Etymology

The word autumn will come from the Previous French word autompne (automne in modern-day French), and was later on normalised to the original Latin word autumnus.[eight] There are scarce examples of its use as early as the twelfth century, but it turned prevalent by the sixteenth century.

Prior to the sixteenth century, harvest was the expression generally applied to refer to the period, as it is prevalent in other West Germanic languages to this day (cf. Dutch herfst, German Herbst and Scots hairst). On the other hand, as additional individuals progressively moved from working the land to residing in cities (particularly these who could go through and create,[quotation wanted] the only individuals whose use of language we now know), the word harvest lost its reference to the time of year and came to refer only to the true exercise of reaping, and autumn, as very well as tumble, started to switch it as a reference to the period.[9][10]

The option word tumble for the period traces its origins to previous Germanic languages. The actual derivation is unclear, with the Previous English fiæll or feallan and the Previous Norse tumble all becoming achievable candidates. On the other hand, these terms all have the meaning “to tumble from a top” and are clearly derived both from a prevalent root or from every other. The expression came to denote the period in sixteenth century England, a contraction of Middle English expressions like “tumble of the leaf” and “tumble of the year”.[eleven]

All through the 17th century, English emigration to the British colonies in North The united states was at its peak, and the new settlers took the English language with them. Whilst the expression tumble progressively turned obsolete in Britain, it turned the additional prevalent expression in North The united states.

Harvest affiliation

Affiliation with the changeover from heat to chilly climate, and its related status as the period of the most important harvest, has dominated its themes and well-known photos. In Western cultures, personifications of autumn are generally quite, very well-fed females adorned with fruits, veggies and grains that ripen at this time. Many cultures attribute autumnal harvest festivals, usually the most important on their calendars. Continue to extant echoes of these celebrations are identified in the autumn Thanksgiving holiday getaway of the United States and Canada, and the Jewish Sukkot holiday getaway with its roots as a complete-moon harvest festival of “tabernacles” (residing in outside huts all-around the time of harvest).[quotation wanted] There are also the several North American Indian festivals tied to harvest of autumnally ripe foodstuff gathered in the wild, the Chinese Mid-Autumn or Moon festival, and several other folks. The predominant temper of these autumnal celebrations is a gladness for the fruits of the earth blended with a specified melancholy linked to the imminent arrival of harsh climate.

This check out is presented in English poet John Keats’ poem To Autumn, where he describes the period as a time of bounteous fecundity, a time of ‘mellow fruitfulness’.

Whilst most foodstuff are harvested in the course of the autumn, foodstuff significantly related with the period incorporate pumpkins (which are integral parts of both equally Thanksgiving and Halloween) and apples, which are applied to make the seasonal beverage apple cider.

Melancholy affiliation

Autumn in poetry has usually been related with melancholy. The options of summer time are gone, and the chill of winter season is on the horizon. Skies transform gray, and several individuals transform inward, both equally physically and mentally.[twelve]

Related examples may well be identified in Irish poet William Butler Yeats’ poem The Wild Swans at Coole where the maturing period that the poet observes symbolically signifies his very own ageing self. Like the all-natural environment that he observes he also has reached his prime and now will have to appear forward to the inevitability of previous age and demise. French poet Paul Verlaine’s “Chanson d’automne” (“Autumn Track”) is likewise characterised by robust, agonizing inner thoughts of sorrow. Keats’ To Autumn, composed in September 1819, echoes this sense of melancholic reflection, but also emphasises the lush abundance of the period.

Other associations

The examples and viewpoint in this short article offer principally with North The united states and do not characterize a all over the world check out of the matter. Make sure you strengthen this short article and explore the difficulty on the chat website page. (August 2013)

Autumn is related with the Halloween period (motivated by Samhain, a Celtic autumn festival),[13] and with it a common internet marketing campaign that promotes it, in the US. The tv, movie, e book, costume, dwelling decoration, and confectionery industries use this time of year to boost merchandise intently related with these types of a holiday getaway, with promotions likely from early September to 31 Oct, due to the fact their themes swiftly eliminate toughness once the holiday getaway ends, and advertising starts concentrating on Christmas.

Television stations and networks, significantly in North The united states, traditionally get started their common seasons in autumn, with new series and new episodes of current series debuting mainly in the course of late September or early Oct (series that debut outside the tumble period are generally regarded as midseason replacements). A sweeps period of time takes spot in November to measure Nielsen Rankings.

Autumn, significantly in most parts of the US, also has a robust affiliation with the get started of a new college year, significantly for little ones in most important and secondary education. “Back again to College” advertising and preparations generally occurs in the weeks foremost to the get started of the tumble period.

Considering that 1997, Autumn has been a single of the major 100 names for girls in the US.[14]

In Indian mythology, autumn is regarded as to be the favored period for the goddess of discovering Saraswati, who is also regarded by the identify of “goddess of autumn” (Sharada).

Tourism

Although colour change in leaves occurs anywhere deciduous trees are identified, coloured autumn foliage is mentioned in several regions of the environment: most of North The united states, Japanese Asia (such as China, Korea, and Japan), Europe, parts of Australia and New Zealand’s South Island.

Japanese Canada and New England are well known for their autumnal foliage,[fifteen][sixteen] and this appeals to big tourism (well worth billions of U.S. dollars) for the regions.

Posted by SaffyH on 2013-twelve-04 08:58:39

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